The sharper edge to traveling in Asia

Bold color fashions from Bangkok: Introducing Muung-Doo’s Masiri Tamsakul

Written By: herbrunbridge - May• 31•10

Masiri Tamsakul’s striking, colorful fashions seem to literally leap out at unsuspecting Bangkok fashion enthusiasts, their playful, yet elegant lines showing themselves off boldly in timeless designs, ready for urban, resort, and elegant occasions. 

As a child, she enjoyed drawing and sketching, and later developed a passion for advertising, getting her BA in Mass Communications and Advertising from Bangkok’s Chulalongkorn University, and an MFA in Visual Communication from Washington D.C.’s George Washington University. She arrived at Muung-Doo in 1999, where owner Na-Chanok Ratanadaros, seeing her talented eye for design, promoted her to product designer in.  She soon was designing cushions and candleholders for Muung Doo’s housewares line.   In 2001, Muung-Doo decided to go full-force into fashion, and Masiri, who had by this time become enamored of Thai silk, launched her first clothing line at Elle Fashion Week in Bangkok. 

In 2003, after taking a pattern class at Alliance Française, she took all pattern-making and sewing in-house.  Today, she has two pattern-makers and five sewers. 

Khun Masiri’s strength is color and texture, and she eschews seasonal fashions, preferring instead to evolve the line as time goes on.  For this reason, shoppers will be able to buy her fashions with constantly progressing detail work.  “Because colors change subtly each time I buy silk, the creations still look new each time I make them.  I will put only two or three examples of each design in our shops, and if Western shoppers cannot find their size, I can make a design for them, generally in one week.”  In addition, she’s custom-designed for Middle Eastern women, who tend to desire longer skirts. 

Masiri has launched three lines of clothing.   Urban Chic has a teenage look, Elegant Chic can be worn for formal and semi-formal occasions, and Resort Chic is a dressy, exotic line that can be worn just about anywhere. 

She’s been heavily influenced by French design, having traveled there continuously since she was small (her father worked for Air France).  Several of her designs include art-deco influenced motifs, and she’s begun to use “smocking” elastic techniques more and more to allow for greater options in sizing.  She prefers Thai silk, both in one and two-ply.     

While you can see her designs on the ThaiOasis website, Masiri encourages you to visit her shops, where you can feel the rich texture of her garments, and admire the fascinating colors of her palette. 

Design Philosophy 

“People want to wear unique clothes, and that’s why I only put 2 or 3 examples of a design in each store.  I produce one or two new designs each week….. I love changing color schemes.I don’t like the idea of developing season-based fashions.  These are fluid designs, and people like wearing these fashions the whole year.  I don’t like silk to look too traditional… I like to add humor and fun, and reach for the younger generation. Sometimes, I’ll reverse the stitching to make it more funky… I’ll cut out pieces, then stitch them back on.  One of the issues with silk is that it can be stiff… and that’s why I like smocking, to allow the fabric to expand and contact with the wearer. I want people who wear my clothes to feel that they’re wearing an art piece… I don’t want people to wear my designs and feel that they’re out of fashion.” 

See Masiri Tamsakul’s designs at: 

Muung-Doo boutique
Emporium department store, 1st floor
BTS Skytrain Phrom Phong station

Muung-Doo boutique
Bangkok Fashion Society shop
Gaysorn Plaza department store, 2nd floor
BTS Skytrain Phrom Phong station

You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>